Monday, October 16, 2006

When I was a little girl, I thought the sun rose and set in my dad. Every bit of extra time he had, he spent with me. He even had a small seat welded to the Caterpillar so I could be with him out in the field on the weekends. We had a 'secret store.' A little market where he would buy me treats. On Sundays, we would go to his business, a furniture store, he would do paper work. I would sit on the counter, open the cash register and count all of the change. I made little stacks of coins, tell him how much was there. He made me feel like I was the most clever girl that ever lived.
My parents separated when I was about 4 and the divorce was final before I began kindergarten. That was the end of that. We all lived in the same town, I saw him from time to time, but it was never the same.
I understand more about what happened now that I'm an adult. My dad(in the picture with his dad in about 1918) was a product of a broken marriage himself. He was the oldest of three boys. When his parents divorced, his mother only took the youngest boy to raise and my dad and uncle were raised by their dad. I don't think he ever forgave his mother for leaving them behind. It set him on a path to have troubled relationships with women his entire life.

We developed a relationship when I became an adult. It was not the same as when I was small, but it was warm and fun. He was a good grandpa to The Princess -- he bestowed the title upon her and made her feel like one. He made us laugh when he deemed chopsticks the only civilized way to eat - then proceeded to eat all his meals with them. We played cards, he beat us all the time and just when it looked like he could never pull it out. He loved to go on picnics and go on long walks. When he retired, he seemed to mellow and relax. He began to enjoy life and the people around him.
It has been five years since he passed away. His wife gave me the cash register from the store. She told me that it had been a gift to my dad from his own dad when he went into business. I never realized that it might have sentimental value for him, too. It's right here on the desk. I keep coins in the trays ready to be counted. Posted by Picasa

13 comments:

Rabbit Stitchings said...

How nice you wound up with the cash register,,,what great memories and to know it held sentiment to your Dad as well, makes it all the more special!

Angie said...

It's all of those "hidden" pieces of life, that when they come together, they paint such a larger picture. Hold your happy memories close.

Hedgehog said...

What a lovely remembrace of your father. I love that you have coins ready to count at all times.

Screen Door said...

What a great keepsake, and a story to pass on in your family.

Fiona said...

I enjoyed your reminiscence of your Dad, the cash register is such an unusual memento.

Sweet P said...

My dad used to have a cash register like that too. I had so much fun playing with it. I have no clue where it is now.

Thanks for sharing a wonderful story about your dad.

joyce said...

I love your cash register. My girls uesd to call them "Chi-chingers" and always wanted to work in a store where they could use one. (They both did for a time). It's a great memory for you.

Princess said...

He DID always win at cards! No matter how good you thought your hand was or how much you thought he wasn't paying attention. Grandpa was a trip! Now you made me tear up a little. :)

Sue said...

These memories you've shared are so special. My parents also divorced (but much later in life). You're right that things are "never the same"
Glad you have the cash register which is full of happy memories!

Shelina said...

What a sweet story and loving tribute to your Dad. And nice to have a cash register as a momento of the special times you shared together.

Cynthia said...

thanks for sharing your story about your dad. What a special memento to have and share with future generations.

KCQuilter said...

What a touching story. You are very wise to have the understanding of what really happened.

Finn said...

Hi Libby, what a lovely story about your dad and you. So much of life seems to be a sentimental journey. And one that has it's ups and downs. I thinks it's human nature to want to remember the 'gold' and forget the 'blue'. And of course the truth lies somewhere in the middle.

I'm so happy for you that some bridges were built and crossed in his later years. And what a delightful thing to have and share with the Princess...*VBS* Hugs, Finn